Yearly Archives: 2011

Morse Code Titanic: The Morse Code Messages from the Titanic

Morse Code Titanic Fact 1: The Titanic Distress Call Was “CQD” – Not “SOS”

The Titanic’s radio operators, Harold Bride and Jack Philips, were employees of a radio telegraph company named “Marconi.” Marconi’s distress call then was CQD, not SOS. CQD is still a common distress call for British ships.

Morse Code Titanic Fact 2: Morse Code Operator Jack Philips Did Not Survive.

The Titanic Morse Code operator Harold Bride did make it off the ship, however, Jack Philips died from exposure.



A Cool New Way to Learn Morse Code

Together, a friend of mine and I, Bryan Campbell, designed a new Morse Code software that allows you to learn Morse Code from your computer, iPad, iPhone, or even other Smartphones.

Here’s a screenshot:

Morse Code Application


So here’s how this Morse Code Software works to help you learn Morse Code.

First, load the Morse Code Application onto your browser. Then, you’ll want to play around a bit with the Morse Code generator. As you play with the buttons, you’ll notice that the Morse Code software allows you to press the “dit,” the “dah,” “Next,” and “Start Over.” To clear the “Recent Letters” at the top of the Morse Code application, press refresh.

When you press “Next,” you’ll hear the Morse Code generator actually “Speak” the letter that you just wrote out in Morse Code using dits and dahs. In the future, we’re going to add some very cool features like, “Share this” and “Tweet this,” etc.

Please let me know your thoughts on this new Morse Code application – it’s brand new and still in Beta testing.


Jericho Morse Code – What Does Jericho Say in Morse Code?

Morse Code is used in the TV seried, “Jericho” in a variety of ways. In a few of the episodes, there is only one way to communicate – and that’s with Morse Code.

The transmissions Jericho with Morse Code happen pretty quickly, and the Morse Code is being transmitted pretty slopily as well.

Here is what the Jericho Morse Code says:

Jericho Episode: The Pilot
Jericho Morse Code: “Jericho Pilot”

Jericho Episode: Fallout
Jericho Morse Code: “Jericho Fallout”

Jericho Episode: Four Horsemen
Jericho Morse Code: “Jericho Three”

Jericho Episode: Walls of Jericho
Jericho Morse Code: “He knows Rob”

Jericho Episode: Federal Response
Jericho Morse Code: “There is a fire”

Jericho Episode: “9.02″
Jericho Morse Code: “The EMP hits”

Jericho Morse Code: Long Live the Mayor
Jericho Morse Code: “Pray for NYC”

Jericho Episode: Rogue River
Jericho Morse Code: Rob not FBI

I hope this helps!

Morse Code Alphabet Video – Learn Morse Code

Here’s a Morse Code video I created which gives the Alphabet in Morse Code.


I basically give the Morse Code alphabet one letter at a time – plus, there’s a secret message in the beginning of the video which will be fun to decode! Email me if you figure out what the secret message means.


Learn Morse Code in only 6 Steps

Morse Code Chart

Morse Code Chart

Created by Samuel Morse in 1844, Morse Code can be sent at great speeds over telegraphs. 166 years later, Morse Code is still used today – mainly by ham radio operators. It can also be useful for emergency communications. Morse Code can be sent with a mirror, a flashlight, or a radio, and you can probably send Morse Code faster than you can send a text message!
Here’s how to get started learning Morse Code.
1. Start listening to Morse Code.
When you listen to Morse Code, what you hear is a series of long and short beeps – more commonly referred to as a “dit” (short) or a “dah” (long). Every letter is separated by a short pause, and every word is separated with a longer pause.
Hint: You can find an online Morse Code translator, search around for practice recordings, or buy a shortwave receiver to listen to some real Morse Code.
You can search or shop for practice recordings, or use a shortwave receiver to listen to the real thing. Some people use the Farnsworth method, which entails listening to Morse code characters at high speeds but with long spaces in between; as you become more proficient, the spacing is reduced.
2. Study a visual copy of the Morse Code alphabet.
A visual chart like the one seen here can certainly help. Try writing down the Morse Code alphabet by hand, and then writing sentences with it. This is one of the best ways to learn Morse Code fast. Once you memorize the Morse Code alphabet, its then an easy task to translate what you heard into what you saw visually. Like anything else worth doing, it takes practice!
3. Practice!
Translating Morse Code is a skill that just about any person can learn, but it absolutely takes practice. When you first start, you can write it down and sound it out, but eventually you’ll need to just hear it. The words “Learn Morse Code” are seen here:
.-.. . .- .-. -. – — .-. … . -.-. — -.. .
4. Transmit often!
One thing that you need to get used to is actually transmitting your Morse Code into audible signals. You can practice with the buttons on a mobile phone, beep vocally, or buy a Morse Code trainer. Whatever works best with you and your budget! To speak Morse Code while you learn, a small sound is pronounced “dit” and a long sound is pronounced “dah.”
5. To Learn Morse Code, don’t bite off more than you can chew.
Start learning Morse Code by memorizing the easiest letters first. One dit is an (E) and one dah is a (T). An (M) is “dah-dah” and an (I) is “dit-dit.” Leave the more complex letters for last, like a J, a B, an L and an F (which I still get confused upon!)
6. Invite your friends!
Learn Morse Code, and then spread it around to your friends! You can then communicate with Morse Code through blinking your eyes, a flashlight, a mirror, or even by tapping your fingers at the dinner table!

Morse Code – From a SmartPhone App?

W0w, I just came across which looks like its a pretty cool SmartPhone app for iPhone, Droid, or iPads.

It looks like you can communicate in either Morse Code or with a different type of code that is not Morse. Using your volume key buttons for dashes and dots, you can pound out a message to your friend in Morse Code.

But – that doesn’t solve the problem! You need to LEARN Morse code before you start using it in conversations with your friends.

Still, this app might be a great way to hone your skills and give you motivation to learn Morse Code – because if you don’t know the Code, how will you send it to your friends?

You won’t.

So, for $0.99 cents, why not? Give it a try. You’ll be sending and receiving Morse Code before you know it, and eventually may love it so much you decide to get your Ham Radio license!

Top 6 Morse Code Searches Translated

It truly baffles me why people are searching the internet for Morse Code related searches. I see people searching for particular Morse Code strings ALL the time!

With that said, I’m going to go ahead and translate some of the most commonly typed Morse Code translations on the web. Here they are!

1. .– . / — .- .. .-.. . -.

This translates to “we mailen.” What the heck does that mean? I can only assume a few things from this – either the people who type this have miss spelled something, or perhaps its a different language. Does anyone have any ideas to help me out?

2. …. . .-.. .–. / — . / .–. .-.. . .- … .

Yeah, this Morse Code search query is pretty odd – and a wee bit creepy. This Morse Code string translates into, “Help Me Please.” With that said, its a little scary – are people just practicing Morse Code because they may need it in the future? I’m not entirely sure. Anyone want to chime in here?

3. …..-….

This is complete gyberish. Nothing at all is in this Morse Code string. Fools :)

4. …- .- .- .-. .– . .-..

Here’s another interesting one. This Morse Code string is actually translated to, “Vaarwel”, which I had no clue was even a word until now. After a quick Google search, I discovered that “Vaarwel” actually means, “Goodbye” or “Farewell.” It seems to be a dutch word. Why people are typing this via Morse Code, I’ll never know.

5. .. .- — .- .-.. .. …- .

This is “I am alive” in Morse Code. Woot woot, I’m alive too!!!!

6. …. . .-.. .-..

What the hell? Hehe, OK, pun intended. This means, “Hell”, but I’m sure people were looking for …. . .-.. .-.. — which is, “Hello.”

New Software to Help You Learn Morse Code

Interestingly enough, I’ve just come across some great software to help learn Morse Code. I tried this software out, and it seems pretty good!

While everything is going on in Egypt right now, the question arises – are Egyptians turning to Morse Code to communicate with the outside world? I have been trying to do some research, and it seems like people are constantly talking about Egyptians and Morse Code and Egypt using Ham Radio, but I can’t find anything to support that. I was on my Ham Radio last night, and I did hear a TON of activity on 40 meters, but I’m not sure if it was just a contest or what.

With that said – even if Egypt has not turned to Morse Code to communicate with each other or the outside world, the question arises – what would you do if our government were to shut down all communication methods?

You’d better believe I’d turn on my Ham radio and start pounding out some Morse Code to my fellow Hams!

Alright, alright, enough about me and my love for Morse Code – here’s the link to download the software I found to learn Morse Code. If you do like it, let me know.

Speak Morse Code – Language for the Handicapped

Speak Morse Code is a web based application designed to give you the ability to both learn Morse Code as well as interact with others. Based off of an idea by Bryan Campbell and Andrew Hallinan, this tool will be available to the public soon.

What really motivated use to create this tool was a heartfelt letter from Esther Medina concerning her son, who was the victim of a gunshot wound to the head which made him unable to speak and almost completely paralyzed. Here is Esther’s letter:


After searching everywhere for some way for my son, Phillip, to communicate I would like to explore the possibility of using Morse code. Phillip was a victim of a gunshot wound to the left side of head. He is very aware of his surroundings, basically it is the motor skills that he lost. He cannot speak and his only usable hand (left-he was right handed) is very awkward and hard to pinpoint his finger on a key or small button. His eyes do not track together well so visual inputs are out. I tried sign language alphabet which he learned and knows very well but his hand is unable to correctly form a quickly recognizable letter for many but the simplest letter signs. He can only stretch the index and thumb.

He can hit an ipad screen button if it is large (such as 2 – 3 on a screen.) So I am imagining him hit one button for a dit and another for a dah and one for end of word… 3 buttons in all.

The problem is how can it be translated since the hospital staff at the subacute where he lives will probably not learn Morse code. Is there an app/program that can interpret? He has been without a voice for 6 years now and am so afraid that when I go (I am 65 yrs and he is 42) he will be left without a voice and no one really taking the time to see what his pointings and gestures mean.

I will google these questions myself but perhaps you can offer suggestions on learning (he has a good memory) and interpreting his messages.

Thank you so much for reading this,

Esther Medina

Esther, Bryan and I can’t wait to provide you with a solution!